The Cost of Crafting

Hmm...

Hmm...

One aspect of crochet and knitting design that's become more and more evident as I've moved onto professional pattern drafting is the cost of crafting. Both crochet and knitting are often seen as "cheap" hobbies - the needles and hooks themselves don't cost too much to begin with. In fact, my first set of both came from various charity shops, and even now I still buy second hand tools when I can. At 10p a pair of needles, I can't complain too much about the cost of my past times, even if I have invested in a set of interchangeable Hiya-Hiya needles and Denise crochet hooks. Two of my spinning wheels are second-hand, and I use locally sourced fleeces as much as possible. Long story short - I manage to find ways to spend as little as possible to ensure I'm never in the red when it comes to fibre crafts.

When designing a pattern, the single most important factor for me is overall cost, even if I don't need to supply the materials myself. If I have an idea for a colour palette and yarn weight, it's easier for me to go and look at what yarns would be suitable for the project, but if the ideal yarn costs £6.50 for 50g of yarn and I need at least 600g to ensure I have enough for the overall length, that's £78 to make a single item. Sure, going for the yarn at £6.50 a ball might produce a beautiful garment, but the cost to make it is high for something, that for many, is a hobby. Of course, there's nothing stopping someone from substituting the recommended yarn for something a bit more special, but when it comes to designing a pattern and working out what yarn to use, my main aim is to make patterns that are affordable for all.